Indian Mathematician and astronomer Brahmagupta

BrahmaguptaBrahmagupta (598–.670 CE) was an Indian Mathematician and astronomer who wrote two important works on Mathematics and Astronomy: the Brahmaphutasiddhanta (Extensive Treatise of Brahma) (628), a theoretical treatise, and the Khandakhadyaka, a more practical text. There are reasons to believe that Brahmagupta originated from Bhinmal. the Durkeamynarda in 672. The Brahmasphutasiddhanta (Corrected Treatise of Brahma) is arguably his most famous work. The historian al-Biruni (c. 1050) in his book Tariq al-Hind states that the Abbasid caliph al-Ma’mun had an embassy in India and from India a book was brought to Baghdad which was translated into Arabic as Sindhind. It is generally presumed that Sindhind is none other than Brahmagupta’s Brahmasphuta-siddhanta.

Brahmagupta was the first to give rules to compute with Zero. The texts composed by Brahmagupta were composed in elliptic verse, as was common practice in Indian mathematics, and consequently has a poetic ring to it. As no proofs are given, it is not known how Brahmagupta’s mathematics was

the application of mathematics to the physical world, rather than about the mathematics itself. In Brahmagupta’s case, the disagreements stemmed largely from the choice of astronomical parameters and theories. Critiques of rival theories appear throughout the first ten astronomical derived.

Although Brahmagupta was familiar with the works of astronomers following the tradition of Aryabhatta, it is not known if he was familiar with the work of Bhaskara I, a contemporary. Brahmagupta had a plethora of criticism directed towards the work of rival astronomers, and in his Brahmasphutasiddhanta is found one of the earliest attested schisms among Indian mathematicians. The division was primarily about chapters and the eleventh chapter is entirely devoted to criticism of these theories, although no criticisms appear in the twelfth and eighteenth chapters.

to be continues…..

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